The Nosferatu + Birdeatsbaby + Miss Fortune @ The Underworld, London

3rd December 2021
Review by Demitri Levantis
Photos by Dovaldė Gaidelionytė

Nineties gothic rock veterans, The Nosferatu returned to London last Friday (3rd Dec) to a small but happy crowd at The Underworld, Camden.

After a small group of goth rock fans, young and old had gathered it was time for the evening to begin with a burlesque act from London based artist, Miss Fortune.

I’d seen Miss Fortune before at club Reptile and in one of Nosferatu’s side-project, Vampyrean’s recent video so I was expecting a good show.

Seeing her come on wearing a blood-red gown and Red Riding Hood-style underwear with Type O Negative’s ‘Christian Woman’ accompanying, her act was nicely timed meaning Fortune had put in much practice.

Miss Fortune
Miss Fortune

Following a nicely paced striptease, she made her crown of thorns headdress bleed offering an erotically blasphemous edge to the performance. I was pleased to see this as it went well with the vampiric theme of the headliners and the audience were just as impressed. Another good job from Miss Fortune.

Next up we had the first band of the night, one who made a huge impact in making me ask, “what am I watching?”

Birdeatsbaby, one of the oddest bands I’ve ever seen, not simply for their frown-inducing name. This four-piece from Brighton emanated a sound that had me asking what they were doing at a gothic-themed gig.

Birdeatsbaby
Birdeatsbaby

There was nothing even remotely gothic about their act. At most I’d say they were a heavily dilated take on dark cabaret acts like the Dresden Dolls, with elements of badly executed prog-rock thrown in.

The addition of an electronic violin did not help either and the vocalist did not hold onto my attention despite showing her ability to growl and sing.

Another example of a band who, compared to the shared themes and aesthetics of the others on the bill has you asking: “Why?” right through the set.

Birdeatsbaby were forgettable to put it politely.

With that questionable act over with, we returned to the world of burlesque.

Miss Fortune
Miss Fortune

Miss Fortune was back, this time doing an act she titled “Bathory,” which explained the hideous head mask she wore along with a black and sparkly dress.

Even though she might have been emulating the infamous, Elizabeth Bathory, I found this act rather funny due to the mask reminding me of Margaret Thatcher in puppet comedy, Spitting Image.

With the humour aside, this was another sexy piece of Fortune’s self-proclaimed “gorlesque” that involved her using a bowl of water, more fake bodily fluids and other props to make the night raunchier and arousing.

Miss Fortune
Miss Fortune

Quite fitting as an opener for the headline act who followed on from her enjoyable gruesome sojourn.

The Nosferatu, touring the world and making memorable gothic rock for as long as I’ve been alive took to the stage (this was the version featuring members Vlad Janicek and Louis DeWray for those confused by the existence of two versions of the band).

The Nosferatu
The Nosferatu

And I have to say, despite guitar player, Rob Leydon needing to replace his instrument at the last minute, this band can still pull off a notable show.

I won’t say this was the best goth-rock show I’ve ever been to, but it was good to see a veteran band whose renditions of classics had me remembering the days I’d listen to Nosferatu and their peers on repeat.

The Nosferatu
The Nosferatu

Tunes ranged from some of their earliest pieces to their 2011 album, “Wonderland” which contains a few memorable tracks. Even though I could see these blokes have been round the world of music many times they still have it in them to put on a memorable show despite the low turnout – something I was quite surprised at given their popularity on the London scene.

Overall, The Nosferatu gave us a decent show that said they still have the strength to make a fun night for anyone obsessed with vampires and ghost stories. It’ll be fun to catch them again in a more gothic setting like Whitby in the future. Good job, lads.

The Nosferatu
The Nosferatu
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