Matricide – When Random Turns To Fate by Tony Bliss

Rating: 1.5/5
Distributor/Label: Independent
Released: December 4th 2013

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BAND LINEUP:

Ran Eliahou – Vocals
Auria Sapir – Guitars
Shahar Guy – Bass
Ofir Zigi – Drums

 

 

 

 

TRACK LISTING:

1. Further From the End
2. Wear & Tear
3. Not An Option
4. What Is Real?
5. Burn Me with Your Sun
6. Set to Clean
7. The Point of No Return
8. Unreality
9. When Random Turns to Fate

REVIEW:

Hailing from a never more metallically fertile Israel, it is certainly fair to say that Matricide fall spectacularly short of representing their homelands best with debut full length ‘When Random Turns To Fate’. At a time where the sheer scope and sterling quality of heavy music sees devotees demanding that much more caliber to sate appetites and demand attentions, this is a record, being the pinnacle of hum-drum metalcore stagnation, that is sure to be left in the dust by its contemporaries.

Plucking out highlights becomes night on impossible as the tracks here bleed seamlessly into a hotch potch of predictable breakdowns, regurgitated melo-death riff work and a tediously monotonous vocal delivery. Indeed, each turn of pace is so unforgivably foreseeable that for the most part, ‘When Random Turns To Fate’ plays out with barely a hint of the dynamic aggression essential of any metal outfit worth their salt.

It is not all bad news, with ‘Set To Clean’ delivering a brief glimpse of Meshuggah-esque savagery and an impressively squalling, ode-to-Slayer guitar lead just about salvaging ‘Wear & Tear’, yet as it is, there is regrettably little offered up by this inaugural offering that is genuinely worth taking with us. Wholly vanilla and boasting nine inter-changeable tracks chock fill of metallic banality, ‘When Random Turns To Fate’ is a, hopefully not fatal, misfire at a time in Matricides career when they would crave to leave the traps sprinting. After falling at the first hurdle, it remains to be seen whether the quartet can dust themselves off and turn in the record that will command international audiences sit up and take notice.

REVIEW BY TONY BLISS
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